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Marlene
Fri Jun 17, 2011, 09:42 AM
Here's an 18 minute youtube video about the synthetic modification of our foods. I'm posting this only to stress how important our diet is to better health and recovery in bone marrow disorders. The sad thing is, we are so unaware of what goes on in the food industry, that even when you think you are eating well, we are still over-exposed to things we would otherwise choose not to have in our food. So many hidden dangers. Over time, these things add up and effect our offspring. More children have food allergies than ever before and are starting life with sub-optimal health. I was shocked to hear what changed in the 90's regarding our food supply and the impact it is now having on our kids.

If you get a chance, take a look.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rixyrCNVVGA

Lbrown
Wed Jun 22, 2011, 03:49 PM
That was a really good speech unfortunately. Since genetically-modified stuff is not labelled, it's pretty hard to avoid.

I manage to grow some stuff organically in my backyard or in pots. So far I have a decent half barrel of leaf lettuce growing like crazy. I snip off enough leaves to make a salad and let it continue to grow. I put in some seed potatoes which are doing very well, and I have some tomatoes in pots on the deck. That's about all I have energy for, and hopefully I won't forget to water them.

Wish I could grow more, but that would require more room and more energy.

Deb

Marlene
Wed Jun 22, 2011, 05:11 PM
Hi Deb,

I too have a little patch of soil that I tend. I have given up on tomatoes this year but it looks like my cucumbers, peppers and chard are doing well. It's getting too hot for the lettuce and my arugula went to flower weeks ago. Our blueberry bush gave us a small harvest this year. After three years, it finally paid for itself.

Here's a link that may help you avoid genetically modified foods. But it's getting pretty difficult to do so.

http://www.NONgmoShoppingGuide.com/

cheri
Wed Jun 22, 2011, 07:34 PM
Buying organic generally insures against GMO foods--and not everything labeled organic or the loosely defined term "natural" is actually good for you....
For instance, soy products can be GMO unless otherwise stated...stay with tofu, tempeh, miso and away from soy dogs and processed foods...

Reading labels is imperative, and SUGAR is the enemy! Cancer loves sugar!Whether it is natural, organic or whatever, it can be found in the strangest of places!

When you watch a fast food commercial on TV, how many pimply faced, overweight adults and children do you see?
Now go into a fast food joint and compare! :eek:

One of my biggest pet peeves is the food they serve in the hospital--loaded with FAT, SALT and SUGAR!!!!!!!

Chirley
Wed Jun 22, 2011, 10:13 PM
Hi Cheri,

I agree with you about the hospital food thing. The hospital I go to serves bacon, eggs and hash browns for breakfast not to mention cake with cream for morning tea, afteroon tea and supper. I'm totally disgusted while I'm eating it, and the second helpings!!

Also the daycare I go to have only full fat milk for tea and coffee and full fat cheese in their sandwiches and with cheese and crackers for morning/afternoon tea. I wish they had choices.

Seriously, I've been trying to keep my cholesterol down and it's very difficult when you spend a lot of time in hospital or daycare. When I go to daycare I now take a low fat cheese and cracker snack pack with me and a couple of pieces of fruit. Started having tea without milk while I'm there too.

Regards

Marlene
Thu Jun 23, 2011, 09:05 AM
Ditto on the hospital food. What are they thinking....BBQ chicken was served at the time John was going through chemo. Needless to say, that didn't work for him.

The most amazing thing is that they push Ensure....loaded with sugar. There's a way to make a healthy, high protein drink. It's not that difficult.

Lbrown
Thu Jun 23, 2011, 02:07 PM
More and more studies are showing fat isn't the problem - refined carbs that replace the fat are worse. Hospital food. What an oxymoron. Seems like it is bad no matter where you go. When I was getting my ATG my hubby would bring in some real food. I took a video of the diabetic breakfast - it was nothing but simple carbs, enough to put someone in a diabetic coma I am sure.

When I got back to Ottawa and ended up in hospital with C diff, at least the food was a little better, not that I could stomach anything.

Deb

Neil Cuadra
Thu Jun 23, 2011, 03:11 PM
I don't envy hospital food planners. Most patients are there briefly and getting them to eat anything is what's most important. If the hospitals serve what people should eat, it might actually work against their purposes. I've seen patients push away food because they don't like what they were served, even though they needed to get their strength back and should have put up with bland food. Serving food patients are used to makes it more likely that patients will take a bite. It's also hard for an institution to produce food in quantity, around the clock, using the freshest ingredients.

The food service department may not be told why you're in the hospital. Unless the doctor is careful about food instructions, they may bring you something inappropriate for your condition. You or your family member should pay attention and speak up about what you want/need or don't want. Patients who order their meals on little paper menus, filled out ahead of time, may not realize that they have to check condiments individually or they won't bring them at all.

Luckily, most hospitals have a nutritionist who will show up if you ask to see them. They can tell you about more healthful choices that are available on request, and order them for you as long as they also meet the doctor's orders (e.g., a low-bacteria diet).

And if you have to put up with tasteless green beans for lunch, consider it an incentive to get well and go home!

Chirley
Thu Jun 23, 2011, 08:17 PM
Hi,

I once asked why the food was not healthy and why the servings were so large and I was told the same thing that Neil just said. That it was better for people to be served things they are likely to eat even if it's not healthy than for one person to go hungry because they wouldn't eat the food or there wasn't enough for them.

Regards

Marlene
Fri Jun 24, 2011, 09:08 AM
I know I'm a bit hard on the issue of nutrition but it wouldn't take much to improve it. I remember meeting with a nutritionist when John was in the hospital and there was no depth to the discussion. Lots of fat & sugar to keep up weight. I have no problem with fat but not all fats are created equal. Until he couldn't eat anymore, I made all his meals for him. Then he went on TPN for about six weeks.

And it's true that if you are admitted for only two or three days, you can put up with anything. But long term, it's not enough.

I find it funny that they tell you not eat any raw food and then they serve you an apple or lettuce & tomato on your sandwich.

Laura
Sat Jun 25, 2011, 01:42 AM
Ditto on the hospital food. What are they thinking....BBQ chicken was served at the time John was going through chemo. Needless to say, that didn't work for him.

The most amazing thing is that they push Ensure....loaded with sugar. There's a way to make a healthy, high protein drink. It's not that difficult.

Can you pass on the recipe? My gut can't handle Ensure at all. I had to drink a can once for a GI test and I was so bloated and distended for days. I felt awful. Would love an alternative for times when my weight drops off (like now).

Laura

Marlene
Sat Jun 25, 2011, 09:11 AM
Can you pass on the recipe? My gut can't handle Ensure at all. I had to drink a can once for a GI test and I was so bloated and distended for days. I felt awful. Would love an alternative for times when my weight drops off (like now).

Laura

I used a whey protein powder which may or may be an issues for you. Let me check it out. But the basic recipe was rice milk, plain protein powder, coconut oil, blueberries, cranberries, banana, a bit of organge juice and then I would add in some nutrients if needed. I would spice it up cinnamon at times. I know others here have some good recipes too. My goal was to get some good protein and fat into the system and keep the sugar down. Berries are a good choice for that and frozen works well. Banana is loaded with sugar but has the potassium as does orange juice. Coconut oil (expeller pressed and organic a must) can be utilized for energy right away and has anti-microbial properties. It's a medium chain fat and is easily digested.