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  #1  
Old Wed Jun 5, 2019, 02:35 PM
David M David M is offline
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Location: Fayetteville, TN
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High Altitude Vacation?

Here is a question for you...

We are considering going to Colorado for a week-long vacation in mid-June. The resort we are considering is at an elevation 9,000+ ft. My hemoglobin has been running from 8.5 - 9.5 range (usually around 9.0).

Will high altitude -- on top of low HGB -- wipe me out even more? Should I consider going somewhere that is not quite as elevated?

I don't want to go to this place if I will feel like a complete slug all week...

David M
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David M, reds/whites/platelets slowly declining since 2000; hypocellular bone marrow; diagnosed as unexplained pancytopenia / "non-typical" slow moving AA; still not at treatment-required levels, but getting there.
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Old Wed Jun 5, 2019, 03:22 PM
Marlene Marlene is offline
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A lot would depend on how active you want to be. We're at sea level and I know when John went to Albuquerque, he got out of breath quicker doing the same level of exercise there as he did at home. His HGB runs 11 -12.

If you plan on hiking, going uphill will be more difficult for sure. Even for someone with normal counts who is not used to the higher altitude will feel it.

Staying hydrated will be important too. I am always surprised at the low level humidity in the western states.
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Marlene, wife to John DX w/SAA April 2002, Stable partial remission; Treated with High Dose Cytoxan, Johns Hopkins, June 2002. Final phlebotomy 11/2016. As of January 2017, FE is 233, HGB 11.7, WBC 5.1/ANC 4.0, Plts 146K.
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Old Wed Jun 5, 2019, 07:53 PM
Sally C Sally C is offline
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Hi David,
I don't know what the elevation of Denver is but when I was there for a few days - with normal blood counts - my heart pounded so hard I literally couldn't sleep at night. The low oxygen really affected me the whole time I was there.
All the best,
Sally
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Old Fri Jun 7, 2019, 12:46 PM
David M David M is offline
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Denver...

According to Wikipedia, Denver (known as "Mile High City") is 5,280 feet above sea level.

I had never really thought about high altitudes causing additional issues, but it does make sense. I guess destination altitude is something to consider when planning such a trip!
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David M, reds/whites/platelets slowly declining since 2000; hypocellular bone marrow; diagnosed as unexplained pancytopenia / "non-typical" slow moving AA; still not at treatment-required levels, but getting there.
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Old Mon Jun 10, 2019, 02:19 AM
Hopeful Hopeful is offline
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Hi David,

I agree with the others that you may feel tired and dizzy at an elevation of 9000 ft. I use to do experiments going to the mountains for a weekend to see if the lack of oxygen would increase my hemoglobin, but alas, it did not.

Having a hemoglobin of 9 for a male is pretty low. It may be time to get another BMB for any insights (like iron stores, for example).

Hope you have a good vacation, wherever you decide to go!
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52 yo female, dx 9/08, AA/hypo-MDS, subclinical PNH, ATG/CsA 12/08, partial response. Tried slow cyclosporine taper over 4+ years. Platelets fell, so back on cyclosporine. Trisomy 6 clone in 5% of cells.
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Old Mon Jun 10, 2019, 04:09 AM
DanL DanL is offline
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I live in denver and did ok down to 8.5 hemoglobin, but many people experience some form of altitude sickness, even when healthy. the key is to take it slow, don't try running. Drink a lot. it takes an extra 5 to 6 glasses of water over your first two days just to properly balance your fluids when coming from sea level.
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