Home         Forums  

Go Back   Marrowforums > Bone Marrow Failure Diseases > AA
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

AA Aplastic anemia

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old Wed Jun 4, 2014, 04:21 PM
KMac KMac is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Golden, Colorado
Posts: 103
A very slow but very good recovery from SAA.

Hi all,

The purpose of this post is to provide encouragement to anyone with severe aplastic anemia, waiting for a response from the ATG/cyclopsorine treatment.

June 7th will be the 2-year anniversary of the date I *should* have responded to the ATG, i.e. 3 months after receiving the treatment. But on that date in 2012 I was still transfusion-dependent, with an ANC that would drop well below 500 without frequent neupogen shots. My iron overload was about 10x normal levels (ferritin ~3000) from all the transfusions, and I was on chelation 40 hours a week while sleeping, with much of my waking hours and most of my energy dedicated to frequent hospital visits.

I understood that statistically most responses to ATG occur within 3 months of treatment, so with every week I remained in that state the chances dwindled that I'd have a decent response. I'd sit in the clinic waiting room awaiting my tri-weekly blood tests, terrified at what they would (or would not) show. I was depressed, frightened, exhausted. I would read Marrowforms at that time, but never post. I figured my story wouldn't be encouraging to others.

Fast-forward to the day before yesterday, and for the first time my CBC indicates I'm no longer anemic - Hgb 14.4, and my platelets are normal at 154. I'm still usually moderately neutropenic, but even that goes away temporarily to fight off a passing bug, which to date my own immune system has always done without any additional meds. As I taper the cyclosporine, of course there is fear of relapse. But so far my counts have actually improved significantly during the taper.

I still experience some residual fatigue, but that is decreasing. In general I keep feeling better and better. I work full time again. Last week I ran a 10k race with my son. Last weekend after mowing the lawn I felt like a 4 mile run in the mountains. I felt pretty good, so that turned into 6 which turned into 8 miles. Really I am brimming with energy. Maybe this is just what *normal* people feel like, and I was anemic for so long I just forgot?

A strange gift of this awful ordeal is the visceral realization that it's wonderful beyond words to simply be alive and in normal health.
__________________
Kevin, male age 45; dx SAA 02/2012 - Hgb 5.8, platelets 14, ANC 200, 1% cellularity. Received ATG 03/2012. As of 03/2015, significant improvement - Hgb 15, platelets 158, ANC fluctuates around 1000, Lymphocytes 620. Tapering cyclosporine. BMB 20-30% cellularity.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old Wed Jun 4, 2014, 05:20 PM
Neil Cuadra Neil Cuadra is offline
Owner
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 2,493
Kevin,

What a positive message to read! Congratulations on the long overdue milestone.

You probably feel better than *normal* people do because you appreciate your good health and new-found stamina more than people who take it all for granted.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old Fri Jun 6, 2014, 09:40 PM
curlygirl curlygirl is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 151
Thank you for updating us! It does make me feel better! Congratulations on your great numbers and the ability to run again!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old Sat Jun 7, 2014, 11:39 PM
Snuuze Snuuze is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Rio Rancho, NM
Posts: 50
I can relate to your despair and your delight at recovery. It took me a good 8 months from the time of my ATG until I began to feel better. I'm not up for a 4 mile run, but then I'm 72 and I didn't run before!

You're so right. We celebrate the "normal" which other people take for granted. I'm happy that I now have the energy to water my tomato plants every day. Three years ago I didn't even consider planting tomatoes because I knew I couldn't take care of them.

Each person's recovery is different. When we look at the expected turn-around of 3 months and expect that for ourselves, we are doomed for disappointment.

Good for you, Kevin!
__________________
Sue, age 72; Dx 6/2010 MDS Int-2. Revlimid unsuccessful, began Aranesp 10/2010; additionally Dx PNH 2/2011, Soliris added 3/2011. ATG 5/2011, Cyclosporine 5/2011. Nplate 10/2011 to 10/2012 . Exjade began 12/2013 due to high ferritin level, discontinued 3/2014 because of increase in creatinine.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old Sun Jun 8, 2014, 01:05 AM
Hopeful Hopeful is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California, USA
Posts: 718
Congratulations on your recovery! Wishing you many more years of energy and joy
__________________
52 yo female, dx 9/08, AA/hypo-MDS, subclinical PNH, ATG/CsA 12/08, partial response. Tried slow cyclosporine taper over 4+ years. Platelets fell, so back on cyclosporine. Trisomy 6 clone in 5% of cells.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old Fri Jun 13, 2014, 05:50 PM
Karenish Karenish is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Stafford, United Kingdom
Posts: 100
congratulations to a fellow slow responder, i took 10 months! 3 years on my counts are still climbing - still on cyclo tho, as doc wants to give my marrow the best chance of recovering totally. At 54 I too no longer take any day for granted, i eat better, drink lots of water and have started to have much ore energy - well done! xxx
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old Sat Jun 14, 2014, 10:12 AM
PrettyFunky PrettyFunky is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 15
Congratulations! It's so great to hear success stories!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old Mon Jun 16, 2014, 12:43 AM
MtnGal MtnGal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 10
Kevin,

Congratulations on your very good news! Sorry I wasn't more excited for you when I saw you at CBCI. I was suffering from "Low H" and hoping the "transfusion police" would be lenient and give me a couple of bags of blood.

It's been a long, strange trip for you but it sounds like things are finally turning around. Thanks for sharing your inspiring story. Hoping I'll have an equally inspirational story to share soon.

Joyce
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old Mon Jun 16, 2014, 03:22 PM
Sue H. Sue H. is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 19
What an inspiring message Kevin. Thank you for sharing this.
My husband (somewhat older than you - 57 years old) was also diagnosed with severe AA 2 months after you and went through the same treatment regime. He also had no significant response at the time. Now 2 years on, having taken Eltrombopag for the past one and a half years, his counts have improved significantly and are also creeping towards normal. The professor at our University Hospital (we live in Switzerland) wants to start reducing Eltrombopag soon. Fingers firmly crossed that counts stay stable.
Was wondering - did you ever have any other treatment (after initial ATG, Ciclosporin) or do anything in particular to encourage counts rising or did it just happen?
This is such a mysterious and baffling disease - which is why stories like yours are so encouraging to hear. Really makes me wonder what it is which makes a difference and promotes healing.
Hope you continue to make great progress. Wishing you all the very best.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old Tue Jul 1, 2014, 03:04 PM
Ellen McDonough Ellen McDonough is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: United States,Denver,Colorado
Posts: 43
Awesome Kevin!!
__________________
Ellen McDonough--Denver,Colorado

[57 year old,diagnosed with Severe Aplastic Anemia 4/2009.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old Tue Jul 1, 2014, 04:47 PM
KMac KMac is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Golden, Colorado
Posts: 103
Hi Sue,

I am glad to hear that your husband's counts have improved so well with the Eltrombopag! I've seen promising reports from NIH that patients can maintain their counts after the Eltrombopag is stopped.

I was very interested in Eltrombopag myself while waiting to get better, but no, I never took any other treatment for SAA after the ATG & cyclosporine. I exercised a lot at high elevations, even when I felt awful, perhaps that has helped in some way (I'd like to think it has, but as you say, this disease is such a mystery).

I regard my immunologist/hematologist's opinion very highly on these matters, and he basically says that sometimes an immune-mediated condition such as SAA can work itself out of a person's system (once the aggressive life-saving treatment on the front-end has done it's job. Without that, as we know, SAA is almost always fatal).

In other words, as I have continued to get better 2+ years after the ATG and during the cyclosporine taper, he does not think my recent improvement is due to a very slow response to treatment. More likely, he thinks that the immune-mediated process that caused my SAA is finally "burning itself out", at this point more-or-less on its own, for reasons not entirely understood. And this immune-mediated process can wax and wane over time, differing from patient to patient (of course, we passionately wish for it to wane so that our counts rise & our marrow stays strong & productive!).

I wish the best for your husband's health and continued success as well.
__________________
Kevin, male age 45; dx SAA 02/2012 - Hgb 5.8, platelets 14, ANC 200, 1% cellularity. Received ATG 03/2012. As of 03/2015, significant improvement - Hgb 15, platelets 158, ANC fluctuates around 1000, Lymphocytes 620. Tapering cyclosporine. BMB 20-30% cellularity.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old Wed Jul 9, 2014, 11:08 AM
Sue H. Sue H. is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 19
Hi Kevin,
Thanks for your interesting feedback and encouraging words. Always helpful to hear from someone who has made a similair journey. So happy that you are doing well now.
We were at the hospital this morning and the bone marrow biopsy my husband had the other week shows encouraging results. We are not "out of the woods" yet but they plan to start reducing Eltrombopag at the start of August. Fingers firmly crossed...
I agree with you about the importance of exercise. This has also been our experience. Arnold (my husband) has always been an outdoor type anyway and the hardest thing about the post ATG phase this time 2 years ago was the weakness and exhaustion he felt. He made himself get out and about each day though, starting off very gently. Fresh air and lots of walking has helped a great deal. We are lucky enough to live in a beautiful area of Switzerland with lots of forests and greenery. Cities tend to exhaust us these days.
Stay well Kevin.
All the best, Sue
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old Thu Jul 10, 2014, 08:21 PM
dmscott65 dmscott65 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Carmichaels, PA
Posts: 11
Congratulations! Encouraging to hear!
__________________
Donna, age 44, diagnosed AA 9/30/10; treated h-ATG 10/3/10 and cyclosporine to 2012; Oct 2012 Duodenal cancer/Whipple procedure; 7/29/13 diagnosed PNH; July 2014 stable but very low HgB & Platelets(25-35)-Cyclosporine; Prednisone and bi-weekly soliris infusions
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old Wed Jul 16, 2014, 11:27 PM
dfantle dfantle is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: bellevue, wa
Posts: 150
Kevin, so happy to read your great news. Congratulations.
__________________
Dena
Age 54; DX Heavy Chain (AH) Amyloidosis 6/10; AutoSCT 3/11; Amyloidosis remission 6/11; DX SAA 7/11; Horse ATG 3/12; Mini MUD SCT 1/13; Recovered from SAA 5/13 & feeling great
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old Thu Jul 24, 2014, 06:58 PM
Fana Fana is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 29
Congratulations Kevin..
__________________
Fana,mother of asad age 8 diagnosed SAA 2014, trying to decide between ATG or BMT..decided on BMT and finally did it
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old Fri Jul 25, 2014, 02:39 AM
kris kris is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: AL
Posts: 50
Smile "Normal"

What a wonderful word to be able to use. Congrats. Your story will give hope and encouragement to many.
__________________
Kris, wife of Rick. DX; MDS/ Ringed Siderblast 5/2006. Supportive care, then Vidaza x 25 mo. HSCT 11//1/11 doing GREAT!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old Mon Sep 1, 2014, 08:59 PM
Rentzi Rentzi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Edgeley, North Dakota
Posts: 22
encouraging

Hello. My husband, 45 years old, was just diagnosed with severe aplastic anemia. We were sent to Rochester MN and received ATG and cyclosporine. We are just 2 weeks out after treatment. His original numbers were Platelets; 1, WBC 1, and red held for awhile 13-14, but have been falling to 10. He has only received platelet transfusions but it looks like red blood cells will be coming. His white has slowly climbed from 0 to 1.4 with neutrophils jumping around but slightly consistent upward trend. slight. We go for labs every MWF and receive transfusions accordingly. From what I can tell here this will be a long road. We are both teachers and he farms on the side with his father. We were hoping at first that he would be back to work in a month or two. It is looking like that is not the case for most. He walks twice daily, and is able to play some golf. We return to Mayo Clinic next week for a check up. This came on quite suddenly with noticeable bruising while we were on vacation. A cat scan revealed a small thymoma which may or may not be causing this. It will have to come out when his counts allow for major surgery. We would love to hear from any of you on this journey.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old Tue Sep 2, 2014, 12:05 AM
Neil Cuadra Neil Cuadra is offline
Owner
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 2,493
Rentzi,

Although you and your husband were hoping for a faster return to normal, your husband has made it past the two most critical junctures, and that's very positive.

First, promptly recognizing and diagnosing the SAA and getting transfusions before your husband's blood counts failed him completely.

Second, getting through the ATG and into the recovery phase. It sounds like your husband didn't have allergic or other bad reactions to the ATG, and that he's in otherwise good health. Those are both very good factors in your favor.

The doctors can't tell you how long it will take your husband's counts to return to the normal range because they don't know. Although ATG has a very good record, it can take many months to see results. And that's just the averages. Every patient is unique and some respond more slowly than others. It's hard to be patient while waiting for such a critical improvement, but it's necessary. In the meantime, your doctor will keep him on immunosuppressants.

My advice: Work with your husband's doctor to balance the drug dosages, follow the doctor's advice carefully, watch for and report any changes or side effects that you notice (even if it's not the day of your appointment), and do your best to take care of yourself, not just your husband. Practice good health habits since it's important to keep opportunistic infections at bay. Make sure that you and any other family members get the fall flu shot to keep your husband out of danger. Finally, stay positive. It's unlucky to have a bone marrow failure disease, but your husband has been on the lucky side when it comes to diagnosis, treatment, and his recovery so far. And he's very lucky to have you learning about the disease and seeking advice.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old Tue Sep 2, 2014, 12:30 PM
MtnGal MtnGal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 10
Thymoma and SAA

Rentzi,

Greetings from Colorado! My pal, Kevin (known as KMac on this forum) alerted me to your message.

First, let me reiterate what Neil said. Your husband has indeed made it past two very important milestones in this aplastic anemia journey: a good diagnosis and what appears to be a good response with no side effects to the ATG treatment. And, no, your husband probably won't be back to work in a month or so. Even if he feels pretty good, with his increased risk of infection, I'm sure his doctor's hair would catch on fire if your husband even suggested going back to work so soon!

And with MWF labs and transfusions as needed, your husband's job title is going to be "professional patient" for a while. As Kevin always reminds me, "This is not a disease for the impatient!"

And, please, do listen to Neil's advice to take care of yourself as well as taking care of your husband. I sometimes think this disease is harder on our caregivers than it is on us. We just take meds, give blood, get some back and basically do what we're told. You do most of the researching, worrying and nagging. That takes a toll on both your physical and mental health. Be kind to yourself!

The reason Kevin alerted me to your message was your comment about a thymoma possibly causing this disease. I was diagnosed with a thymoma about a month ago after my hematologist sent me for a CT scan because I was having chest pain and shortness of breath. I was also requiring RBC transfusions at a higher threshold level (<30 hematocrit) than their average patient to control those symptoms.

My hematologist's office (Colorado Blood Cancer Institute in Denver) does not do routine CT scans for aplastic anemia patients unless the patient is headed straight for transplant. I was diagnosed back in November 2012 at age 56, had ATG and was doing great. After six months, my blood counts were, for the most part, in the normal range and I had almost completely weaned off the cyclosporine by the end of 2013. January of this year, however, my numbers started to tumble so I am now back on ~400 mg cyclosporine a day and having RBC transfusions every 4-6 weeks.

My doctor was thinking I relapsed because we'd weaned off the cyclosporine too quickly. Now we're (or should I say "I" -- he won't commit at this point) thinking that this undiagnosed thymoma may have caused the relapse if not the original disease. I've been doing a lot of research (as I'm sure you have, as well) and it appears thymomas are implicated in all sorts of autoimmune diseases, including, very rarely, aplastic anemia. (I just had to laugh when I started researching thymomas. They are very rare tumors, rarely implicated in aplastic anemia, which is itself a very rare disease. With these odds, I should be winning the Lotto don't you think?)

I'm scheduled to have the thymoma removed in November and hoping that will turn around this relapse. (My doctor isn't promising anything.)

Anyway, I will keep both of you in my thoughts and wish you strength and courage (and patience!) as you tackle this disease. It sounds like your husband has a great team working for him (you being his #1 advocate!) and I'm glad you found Marrowforums. There's a great group of people on this forum and we're all pulling for you!

Joyce
Diagnosed VSAA 11/2012; treated with ATG/CsA; relapsed 1/2014, currently on cyclosporine & RBC transfusions every 4-6 weeks.


p.s. If you'd like to communicate privately via messaging on this site or by email, I'd love to hear from you. I've got tons of articles I could share about the relationship between thymoma and AA. I need to go check my settings and make sure I'm set up to do that, but will get those options activated as soon as I post this message. http://www.marrowforums.org/faq/communications.html
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old Tue Sep 2, 2014, 03:47 PM
triumphe64 triumphe64 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Dallas, Texas
Posts: 440
Thymoma can also be a cause of PRCA.

Dr. Maciejewski had a patient without thymoma but with an enlarged thymus gland. Once it was removed the patient improved just as if it had been an actual thymoma.
__________________
Dallas, Texas - Age 76 - Pure Red Cell Aplasia began March 2005 - Tried IVIG - Then cyclosporine and prednisone. Then Danazol, was added. Then only Danazol . HG reached 16.3 March 2015. Taken off all meds. Facebook PRCA group https://www.facebook.com/groups/PureRedCellAplasia/
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old Tue Sep 2, 2014, 08:17 PM
MtnGal MtnGal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 10
Thymoma and PRCA

Dear triumphe64,

In doing my research, I did indeed find thymomas implicated in PRCA (why do I always think Pro Rodeo Cowboys when I see that acronym?) They are also implicated in a variety of other autoimmune diseases including myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and pernicious anemia. Reading about the relationship between thymomas and autoimmune diseases is what got me wondering, "Aplastic anemia is thought to be an autoimmune disease. Could there be a link with thymoma?" Sure enough, I found a few journal articles proposing a link between the two diseases.

Since thymomas are often discovered when the patient has a CT scan for something else, I have to wonder if I'd had a CT scan when first diagnosed with AA could I have avoided a relapse? Guess there is no way to know for sure, but I'd be curious to know how many AA patients have a CT scan as part of their diagnostic workup, especially those who are treated with ATG rather than going to transplant. I was told my clinic does not do them routinely for AA patients unless a patient will have a transplant and then it's done mostly to check the lungs for potential fungal infections.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old Tue Sep 2, 2014, 11:19 PM
triumphe64 triumphe64 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Dallas, Texas
Posts: 440
PRCA patients should all have a CT scan. I hadn't heard of them as routine for AA.

FYI: At the recent patient Conference in Detroit Dr. Maciejewski mentioned that one theory of AA is that the autoimmune response was an overreaction to the immune system attacking a leukemia. The reason for this theory is that they have found some miscellaneous leukemia DNA in some cases.
__________________
Dallas, Texas - Age 76 - Pure Red Cell Aplasia began March 2005 - Tried IVIG - Then cyclosporine and prednisone. Then Danazol, was added. Then only Danazol . HG reached 16.3 March 2015. Taken off all meds. Facebook PRCA group https://www.facebook.com/groups/PureRedCellAplasia/
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old Thu Sep 4, 2014, 10:49 AM
Rentzi Rentzi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Edgeley, North Dakota
Posts: 22
Red face Thank you.

Thank you all for replying! Yesterday we met with our "local" hematologist who is two hours away. We see him every Wednesday. He ordered the cat scan upon our initial hospital visit (post bmb) before the first doctor we saw sent us to Rochester. He caught me in the hallway and seemed quite excited that he saw the thymoma. He said for a person to have two very rare conditions existing together, he can't help but to think they are related. He said typically the thymoma will cause red cell anemias but it is posted around that it can be related to AA. He has sort of backed off because Mayo has swept in giving their orders. We feel very blessed to have this guy in our corner and have encouraged him to speak up when conferring with Rochester. In Rochester, they sort of overlooked the Thymoma since first and foremost was getting him treated for the VSAA. I believe we are meeting with a thoracic surgeon when we go back next Monday. Did anyone have elevated liver enzymes initially with this disease? They are leveling off for some reason.... My husband had a blood test in June in relation to abdominal discomfort and they noted elevated enzymes leading to an abdominal ultrasound. All clear and blood counts were low normal at that time. Mayo seems to think all this started to crash around the first of July. Thymoma was about 1 inch when we started this but our local hematologist thinks it will shrink while on the steroids. He continues to comment on how good my husband looks even with his lab counts. He thinks Mayo will be shocked as well. He doesn't feel sick aside from occasional lightheadedness and the bruises which seem to be healing. I'm sorry this rambles on but my mind seems to be running fast forward as well. Tomorrow will be three weeks after finishing the atgm treatment. I am teaching and following our four kids' activities. Our small town has rallied around us and are blessing us with their help. We are praying for healing,patience and positivity and I am grateful for having found this site. I am very interested in the articles about thymomas and AA. Take care and have a great day.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old Thu Sep 4, 2014, 12:30 PM
triumphe64 triumphe64 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Dallas, Texas
Posts: 440
I like the way your local guy is willing to think outside the box.

An aside on thymoma: The TV show "House" had a patient (bicycle rider) who had both PRCA and MG. Dr. House found this with two minutes left in the show, the thymus was removed, and the patient went back to normal.

This combination happens about once every three years in the entire world.
__________________
Dallas, Texas - Age 76 - Pure Red Cell Aplasia began March 2005 - Tried IVIG - Then cyclosporine and prednisone. Then Danazol, was added. Then only Danazol . HG reached 16.3 March 2015. Taken off all meds. Facebook PRCA group https://www.facebook.com/groups/PureRedCellAplasia/
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old Fri Sep 5, 2014, 12:52 AM
MtnGal MtnGal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 10
Rentzi,

I did not experience elevated liver enzymes when first diagnosed, but they skyrocketed after my ATG treatment. I think its a pretty common side effect of the drug. I was also on a heavy-duty anti-fungal med (voriconazole) for a while and it can also be hepatotoxic. Fortunately, once I got off the anti-fungal, the liver enzymes returned to normal fairly quickly.

Here are some links to a few articles about AA and thymoma. I guess I exaggerated a bit about having a "ton" of articles.

Thymoma followed by Aplastic Anemia http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3459379/

Thymoma-associated Severe aplastic anemia
http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/25/22/3374.full.pdf

Very Severe Aplastic Anemia appearing after Thymectomy
http://www.kjim.org/upload/42806876.pdf


triumph64 -- Isn't House the most ridiculous show ever? The writers must scour the internet for extremely rare diseases to feature every week. And I love how the doctors are always searching patients' homes to look for clues to their disease. Most of us can barely get the docs to spend more than 15 minutes with us during an office visit let alone have them breaking into our houses!

Speaking of extremely rare, I failed to mention that in addition to my rare bone marrow disorder (aplastic anemia) and rare thymoma, I was also diagnosed with hyperparathyroidism late last year. This condition which results in high serum calcium levels, is most often caused by a benign tumor on one or more of the parathyroid glands. A very good friend of mine (I call her my Chief Medical Information Officer) found some articles linking, in very rare cases, parathyroid tumors with thymomas. So that's "very rare" cubed for those of you keeping score.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wheatgrass is a good iron chelator Robi1Knobi Alternative Treatments 6 Fri Sep 18, 2015 05:22 PM
New member with SAA - introducing myself KMac Tell Your Story 2 Sun Oct 21, 2012 11:14 PM
SAA - recovery question clairekim AA 2 Tue Mar 13, 2012 07:11 PM
Some good news. Rosemary MDS 1 Sun Nov 7, 2010 12:30 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Forum sites may contain non-authoritative and unverified information.
Medical decisions should be made in consultation with qualified medical professionals.
Site contents exclusive of member posts Copyright 2006-2019 Marrowforums.org