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  #1  
Old Wed Aug 21, 2013, 11:53 AM
dhruba_bd dhruba_bd is offline
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Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Does Canada or Australia allow post BMT patient(more than 2 years) as a immigrant

Dear all,

I know it is a different type of question. However, I want to know whether Canada or Australia does allow post BMT patient(more than 2 years) as a immigrant or not.

I had my BMT on 17-March-2011 and now doing very well. I have not receive any blood since May,2011 and now planning to immigrate Australia or Canada. Hence, it is very urgent for me to know the above question.

If anyone help me, I will be grateful to him/her.

Dhruba
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  #2  
Old Wed Aug 21, 2013, 02:27 PM
SAA Mom SAA Mom is offline
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I do not know the answer for your question but I do have a question for you since they have talked about my son possibly having a MUD BMT. Was your BMT a sib match or MUD match? Do you have any graft vs host?
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  #3  
Old Wed Aug 21, 2013, 05:25 PM
Neil Cuadra Neil Cuadra is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhruba_bd View Post
I want to know whether Canada or Australia does allow post BMT patient(more than 2 years) as a immigrant or not.
I can't give you a definitive answer but I know the general restrictions.

This page lists the restrictions on Canadian immigration. It says you can be denied permission to immigrate if your condition is likely to
  1. endanger public health or public safety, or
  2. cause excessive demands on health or social services
(unless you have family already in Canada, in which case you can bypass some of the restrictions).

Restriction #1 shouldn't apply to you. Nobody can "catch" aplastic anemia from a former AA patient. Since you aren't undergoing active treatment perhaps #2 wouldn't apply either, but you probably need to ask someone experienced with Canadian immigration. You could also ask the Aplastic Anemia & Myelodysplasia Association of Canada for advice about it.

Australia has similar health restrictions, saying you must be free from a disease or condition that is
  1. considered to be a threat to public health or a danger to the Australian community
  2. likely to result in significant health care and community service costs to the Australian community
  3. likely to require health care and community services that would prejudice the access of Australian citizens and permanent residents to those services in short supply.
Again, #1 shouldn't apply. This page says that cancer is one of the most common diseases to result in a failure to meet the health requirement, but aplastic anemia is not a cancer and after a transplant you should be cured anyway. Again, you may need to consult an immigration expert to know for certain.
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  #4  
Old Thu Aug 22, 2013, 12:42 AM
dhruba_bd dhruba_bd is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Dhaka, Bangladesh
Posts: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil Cuadra View Post
I can't give you a definitive answer but I know the general restrictions.

This page lists the restrictions on Canadian immigration. It says you can be denied permission to immigrate if your condition is likely to
  1. endanger public health or public safety, or
  2. cause excessive demands on health or social services
(unless you have family already in Canada, in which case you can bypass some of the restrictions).

Restriction #1 shouldn't apply to you. Nobody can "catch" aplastic anemia from a former AA patient. Since you aren't undergoing active treatment perhaps #2 wouldn't apply either, but you probably need to ask someone experienced with Canadian immigration. You could also ask the Aplastic Anemia & Myelodysplasia Association of Canada for advice about it.

Australia has similar health restrictions, saying you must be free from a disease or condition that is
  1. considered to be a threat to public health or a danger to the Australian community
  2. likely to result in significant health care and community service costs to the Australian community
  3. likely to require health care and community services that would prejudice the access of Australian citizens and permanent residents to those services in short supply.
Again, #1 shouldn't apply. This page says that cancer is one of the most common diseases to result in a failure to meet the health requirement, but aplastic anemia is not a cancer and after a transplant you should be cured anyway. Again, you may need to consult an immigration expert to know for certain.
Thank you very much for your reply. Thanks a lot.
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  #5  
Old Thu Aug 22, 2013, 12:45 AM
dhruba_bd dhruba_bd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SAA Mom View Post
I do not know the answer for your question but I do have a question for you since they have talked about my son possibly having a MUD BMT. Was your BMT a sib match or MUD match? Do you have any graft vs host?
My only elder sister was my donor. I have a chronic GVHD, though it is not not a serious one.
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