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Pediatrics Treatment for juvenile patients

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  #1  
Old Mon Jul 15, 2013, 09:36 PM
Neil Cuadra Neil Cuadra is offline
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Explaining bone marrow failure, tests, and treatments to kids

British website Medikidz provides medical information aimed at a child's level of understanding. Despite the serious topics, they use cartoons and simple explanations to give basic information about diseases and procedures that could help young patients understand what's going on.

Here are some of their explanations that would be appropriate for kids of about age 8 and older.
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Old Tue Jul 16, 2013, 05:02 PM
riccd2001 riccd2001 is offline
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A good easy-to-read set, but...

Thanks for the link Neil. I'd say these are well-written even for adults who have been drawn into AA and MDS as patients or caregivers too; however, there are a few mistakes. For example, under blood transfusions "The blood for transfusions is stored in small plastic bags. Each of these holds about half a litre of blood, which is usually given over 1 or 2 hours."

In over 230 PRBC bags the most I've had was 345ml over 2 hours!
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Ric: Low-risk MDS (blasts <4%); 4 cycles Revlimid no positive response; PRBC transfusion dependent; so far, 392'units' over 8 3/4 years; BMB #4 (15/04/01) shows evolution to AML (blasts 20-30%) 47,XY,del(5) (q22q35),+21[24][cp24]/46,XY(1).
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Old Tue Jul 16, 2013, 09:26 PM
Neil Cuadra Neil Cuadra is offline
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Perhaps they got it wrong, but I wonder if it might reflect differences between practices in the Canada and the U.K.

I know, for example, that in the U.K. they collect more blood per donation from blood donors, compared to in the U.S. That's why U.K. blood donors can't donate as often. Maybe they typically use higher quantities for transfusions as well.
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Old Tue Jul 16, 2013, 11:25 PM
Chirley Chirley is offline
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I've never had a unit of blood with more than 290 mls here in Aus. Most are around 240-250 mls. I've had some with as little as 150.

Perhaps some countries put more anticoagulant in as well?

Chirley
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Old Wed Jul 17, 2013, 12:44 PM
Lbrown Lbrown is offline
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At my hospital in Canada, the nurses tell me 300 ml is a standard unit of red cells. I often get bigger and smaller ones, 250 ml would be considered small.

Deb
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